Are cables within the scope of RoHS 2?

Generally from 3 January 2013 cables are in scope of RoHS2, unless they specifically belong to an EEE or a combination of EEE that is outside the scope of RoHS 2. Cables that are used for the transfer of electrical currents or electromagnetic fields are EEE. Cables that fall within one of the product categories of RoHS 1 were already in the scope of RoHS 1.

In order to place a cable in a specific category, the type and intended use of the cable must be taken into consideration. Specialized cables such as SCART-cables, HDMIcables and network-cables, which are used for example in voice, data and video transfer, are in categories 3 or 4. Non-finished cables such as cable reels without plugs were not in the scope of RoHS1 and can be classified as category 11. Cables that were not in the scope of RoHS 1 are exempted from the RoHS provisions until 22 July 2019.

Cables can form part of another EEE placed on the market, or they can be placed on the market individually. Cables that form part of an EEE can be internal (permanently attached) or external (externally connected and removable, but sold together or marketed/shipped for use with the EEE). Cables specifically intended for medical equipment and monitoring and control equipment will come under the RoHS provisions on the appropriate dates.

What are the requirements for internal wires and internal cables?

Internal wires are not cables. Internal wiring in any EEE that is within the scope of RoHS 2 must simply meet the material restrictions like all other parts of the EEE; there is no individual CE marking and DoC requirement. If an EEE is subject to a transition period or a scope exclusion, the same applies to the internal wiring. The same principle applies to permanently attached cables, e.g. most lamp cables.

What are the requirements for external cables?

External cables that form part of another EEE because they are sold together or marketed/shipped for use with an EEE, e.g. power cords, must meet the material restrictions but do not need an individual CE marking and Declaration of Conformity if they are covered by the DoC for the EEE and the EEE is CE marked. The cable always follows the same technical requirements as the EEE it belongs to.

External cables placed on the market separately that are not part of another EEE must meet the material restrictions and will need their own Declaration of Conformity and CE marking from the relevant date.